A Happy Day for Liberty

Today (14 May 2013), Minnesota joins eleven other states in legalizing gay marriage. I’ve written about this so many times before, so regular readers know my thoughts on the subject. Congratulations, Minnesotans. I do hope the rest of the country will follow soon.

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7 thoughts on “A Happy Day for Liberty

  1. orlin sellers

    I simply can not see how this is some sort of red letter day for liberty. It certainly doesn’t promote freedom and liberty for three, four, five or a dozen people who want to be married.
    IMO, it merely solidifies the notion that only two people can marry and stomps on the freedom of those who want alternative choices to do as they please.

    Reply
    1. Greg Camp Post author

      How does it stomp on anyone’s freedom? Yes, polygamy is still illegal, but what this law does is expand the freedom for one group. Any gain is a gain.

      Reply
  2. orlin sellers

    You seem to have a tendency to favor liberty for certain groups as opposed to liberty for individuals.. This is not an accusation, just an observation.

    Reply
    1. Greg Camp

      Not true. I’m not sure what point you’re trying to make here. I’ve said before (see the link under the word “so” in the article) that I favor a civil union status for households, without any reference to the kind of relationship. Let sexual partners, friends, roommates, whatever set up a household for tax purposes and the like. Leave marriage out of government calculations.

      But that doesn’t prevent me from celebrating even a small gain.

      Reply
  3. orlin sellers

    I read ‘so’. I’m not sure how you can say that there are societal benefits of family if you don’t have an absolute definition of family, husband, wife, spouse, etc.
    The problem I see is that, if you approve of government programs yet, reject government involvement in marriage, it is like trying to have your cake and eat it too,

    Reply
    1. Greg Camp

      Legal marriage has economic implications–taxes, inheritance, insurance, etc. Those are civil matters, not religious. What I’m saying is that “Household” could be a legal status that would cover those things.

      Reply
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